Frequently Asked Questions

If you are thinking about buying an electric bikes, these questions and answers may be just what you need to try and understand all the benefits. If you still can’t find what you want to know then please call us as we will be happy to put your mind at rest

What exactly is an electric bike anyway?

 Fundamentally, an e-bike is a standard bicycle that has been fitted with or designed to incorporate electrical assistance in the form of a battery and motor.
They are not the same as a motorbike or moped and they do not require tax, insurance or MoT and can still be ridden on cycle paths and towpaths etc.

Electric bikes are a new and promising alternative form of urban transportation. They provide all the advantages of a regular bicycle: fun exercise, free parking, zero emissions, and freedom from gridlock, while eliminating one of the bicycle’s more serious drawbacks, lack of power. Imagine pedalling up a hill as comfortably as riding down, that’s what the e-bike experience is all about. In most situations in the city, riding an electric bike will be faster and cheaper than either cars or public transit.

You can pedal normally and just use the motor to help out on hills and headwinds, or use the motor all the time just to make riding easier. The experience is entirely different from riding a gas scooter or motorbike. Here the electric assistance is perfectly smooth and silent, and it complements rather than supplanting human power.

Who can ride an eBike?

In the UK anyone 14 years of age or older can legally ride an electric bike.

Do all eBikes work the same way?

No. There are two main types of electric bike.
Throttle-Assist (twist and go):
 Bikes are controlled with a twist throttle on the handlebar. There is no need to pedal to get started or when riding if you chose not to.
Pedal-Assist: Bikes that require that you are pedalling at all times for the motor to engage and assist depending upon how much pressure you are applying to the pedals.

Won’t the extra weight make it difficult to pedal without the motor?

 The short answer is yes but not much. The effect of weight is largely exaggerated in how a bicycle performs. People spend thousands to shave off a few pounds for a really high-end bike. But since the rider is already at least 5-6 times heavier than the bike, the vehicle weight itself makes minimal difference. A heavier bicycle is slightly harder to ride uphill, somewhat faster to ride downhill and pretty much the same on the flat as a lighter bike.

The addition of a motor and batteries can add anywhere about 8-12 kilos to a bike but has surprisingly little effect on its ride ability. You definitely do notice the weight if you have to pick the bike up and carry it for any reason though.

The 8-12 kilos of additional weight are more than made up for in hauling capacity on even the steepest of hills, and trip times with an e-bike are usually between 20-30% faster than a regular bicycle.

How many miles can I expect to get from a single charge of the battery?

This depends on a few factors and conditions which are mostly:
How much effort you put in yourself
The power assistance level you chose
The capacity of the battery (measured in Amp Hours [Ah])
How many hills you are climbing or descending where you’re riding
The weight of the rider
As a rule of thumb, you should realistically expect to get about 20 to 30 miles out of a single full battery charge.

* Please be aware that some manufacturers’ websites quote unrealistic mileages (often quoting a fixed mileage for a bike) that are taken from a flat test track or a very capable rider using minimal power to achieve high mileages and this is simply not a realistic measurement for real world use and ignores some of the major contributing range factors stated above.

What is ‘Ah’?
Ah (Amp Hours) is a measure of the capacity of a battery.
The higher the Ah rating, the longer the batteries will last and therefore the greater the range.
E.G. a 14Ah battery will last 40% longer than a 10Ah battery.
The higher the Ah rating the better, although higher Ah batteries cost and weigh more.

*Though some unscrupulous shops may tell you that the higher the Ah the faster the bike is; this is not true.

How much power does an eBike use?

 The average power that a typical cyclist will deliver is on the order of 150 watts, or 1/5th of a horsepower. If you’re curious, most modern exercise bikes will display the exact wattage and you can get a feel for how much power you’re producing with the legs. A fit individual can sustain 350 watts for about 10 minutes and up to 600 watts for a few seconds, but for continuous riding between 100-200 watts is typical. You might think then that 150 watts would be all you need for an e-bike, but if you ever ride a 150 watt bike it will feel unimpressive. When a cyclist hits a hill, they switch to an easy gear and the speed drops to 10-15 km/hr as they work hard and move at a slow pace. For a good ride

For comparison, car engines are usually several hundred horsepower, and travel at a comparable average speed in the city, and only twice as fast outside.

Does it recharge the batteries while you pedal?

 This is one of the most commonly asked technical questions we get and it shows that the advantages and capabilities of electric drives are widely known. Currently, most electric cycles do not have regeneration due to the extra cost and weight of the technology; plus regeneration will only give you about 10% charge back into the battery at best – you consume far more power than you can realistically put back into the bike from riding / rolling downhill alone. Recharging from pedalling is not really the intent of the electric drive as it is with, say, a hybrid car. In general, with an e-bike you draw a net amount of power out of the battery pack to assist you riding. You then replenish this energy from the wall outlet, rather than by working extra hard later on in the trip. It would be like hauling a heavy trailer with two flat

All of our bikes get all their power from a bike mounted battery which is recharged at home or work using a standard UK 13amp socket.

What is the cost of electricity to recharge a battery?

It only costs around 5p to 10p worth of electricity to fully recharge a battery, although we recommend you ‘top-up’ the battery after use, in which case it will cost a matter of pence to do this!

How long does it take to recharge the battery?

 Around 3 to 5 hours from a completely flat battery to fully charged depending on battery capacity and charge rate. However, we recommend keeping Lithium Ion batteries topped up regularly after use and never left for long periods of time without a top-up charge.

How fast will an electric bike go?

European law states that an electric bike can only assist you up to 15.5mph, although you can pedal or freewheel faster than this if you wish, like a normal bike.

Some bikes have lights powered from the bike battery – what happens when the bike battery runs out?

The lights will usually continue to work as normal for several hours after the bike has stopped assisting you, as powering a couple of lights takes a tiny amount of power compared to powering the bike’s motor.
In rare situations when the bike has been under a great load up an extended hill on warmer days, the battery’s thermal safety cut-out may enable that will stop all power to the bike and lights – this only happens under extreme conditions though.

Do you deliver and if so, who much does delivery cost?

Yes, we will deliver electric bikes to any UK mainland address for free and will endeavour to get your order out the next working day.

Yes, we will deliver electric bikes to any UK mainland address for free and will endeavour to get your order out the next working day

The lights will usually continue to work as normal for several hours after the bike has stopped assisting you, as powering a couple of lights takes a tiny amount of power compared to powering the bike’s motor.
In rare situations when the bike has been under a great load up an extended hill on warmer days, the battery’s thermal safety cut-out may enable that will stop all power to the bike and lights – this only happens under extreme conditions though.

European law states that an electric bike can only assist you up to 15.5mph, although you can pedal or freewheel faster than this if you wish, like a normal bike.

Around 3 to 5 hours from a completely flat battery to fully charged depending on battery capacity and charge rate. However, we recommend keeping Lithium Ion batteries topped up regularly after use and never left for long periods of time without a top-up charge.

It only costs around 5p to 10p worth of electricity to fully recharge a battery, although we recommend you ‘top-up’ the battery after use, in which case it will cost a matter of pence to do this!

This is one of the most commonly asked technical questions we get and it shows that the advantages and capabilities of electric drives are widely known. Currently, most electric cycles do not have regeneration due to the extra cost and weight of the technology; plus regeneration will only give you about 10% charge back into the battery at best – you consume far more power than you can realistically put back into the bike from riding / rolling downhill alone. Recharging from pedalling is not really the intent of the electric drive as it is with, say, a hybrid car. In general, with an e-bike you draw a net amount of power out of the battery pack to assist you riding. You then replenish this energy from the wall outlet, rather than by working extra hard later on in the trip. It would be like hauling a heavy trailer with two flat.

All of our bikes get all their power from a bike mounted battery which is recharged at home or work using a standard UK 13amp socket.

The average power that a typical cyclist will deliver is on the order of 150 watts, or 1/5th of a horsepower. If you’re curious, most modern exercise bikes will display the exact wattage and you can get a feel for how much power you’re producing with the legs. A fit individual can sustain 350 watts for about 10 minutes and up to 600 watts for a few seconds, but for continuous riding between 100-200 watts is typical. You might think then that 150 watts would be all you need for an e-bike, but if you ever ride a 150 watt bike it will feel unimpressive. When a cyclist hits a hill, they switch to an easy gear and the speed drops to 10-15 km/hr as they work hard and move at a slow pace.

For comparison, car engines are usually several hundred horsepower, and travel at a comparable average speed in the city, and only twice as fast outside.

Ah (Amp Hours) is a measure of the capacity of a battery.
The higher the Ah rating, the longer the batteries will last and therefore the greater the range.
E.G. a 14Ah battery will last 40% longer than a 10Ah battery.
The higher the Ah rating the better, although higher Ah batteries cost and weigh more.

*Though some unscrupulous shops may tell you that the higher the Ah the faster the bike is; this is not true.

This depends on a few factors and conditions which are mostly:
How much effort you put in yourself
The power assistance level you chose
The capacity of the battery (measured in Amp Hours [Ah])
 How many hills you are climbing or descending where you’re riding
 The weight of the rider
As a rule of thumb, you should realistically expect to get about 20 to 30 miles out of a single full battery charge.

* Please be aware that some manufacturers’ websites quote unrealistic mileages (often quoting a fixed mileage for a bike) that are taken from a flat test track or a very capable rider using minimal power to achieve high mileages and this is simply not a realistic measurement for real world use and ignores some of the major contributing range factors stated above.

The short answer is yes but not much. The effect of weight is largely exaggerated in how a bicycle performs. People spend thousands to shave off a few pounds for a really high-end bike. But since the rider is already at least 5-6 times heavier than the bike, the vehicle weight itself makes minimal difference. A heavier bicycle is slightly harder to ride uphill, somewhat faster to ride downhill and pretty much the same on the flat as a lighter bike.

The addition of a motor and batteries can add anywhere about 8-12 kilos to a bike but has surprisingly little effect on its ride ability. You definitely do notice the weight if you have to pick the bike up and carry it for any reason though.

The 8-12 kilos of additional weight are more than made up for in hauling capacity on even the steepest of hills, and trip times with an e-bike are usually between 20-30% faster than a regular bicycle.

No. There are two main types of electric bike.
Throttle-Assist (twist and go): Bikes are controlled with a twist throttle on the handlebar. There is no need to pedal to get started or when riding if you chose not to.
Pedal-Assist: Bikes that require that you are pedalling at all times for the motor to engage and assist depending upon how much pressure you are applying to the pedals.

In the UK anyone 14 years of age or older can legally ride an electric bike.

Fundamentally, an e-bike is a standard bicycle that has been fitted with or designed to incorporate electrical assistance in the form of a battery and motor.
They are not the same as a motorbike or moped and they do not require tax, insurance or MoT and can still be ridden on cycle paths and towpaths etc.

Electric bikes are a new and promising alternative form of urban transportation. They provide all the advantages of a regular bicycle: fun exercise, free parking, zero emissions, and freedom from gridlock, while eliminating one of the bicycle’s more serious drawbacks, lack of power. Imagine pedalling up a hill as comfortably as riding down, that’s what the e-bike experience is all about. In most situations in the city, riding an electric bike will be faster and cheaper than either cars or public transit.

You can pedal normally and just use the motor to help out on hills and headwinds, or use the motor all the time just to make riding easier. The experience is entirely different from riding a gas scooter or motorbike. Here the electric assistance is perfectly smooth and silent, and it complements rather than supplanting human power.